How to plant horse chestnuts

how to plant horse chestnuts

Growing a Chestnut Tree from Seed

Tolerant to an array of soils, the horse chestnut will grow in acidic, moist, loamy, sandy, and silty loam soils--however, the soil should always be kept moist and well-drained. Sow one horse chestnut in each container. Dig a planting hole with a depth equal to the diameter of the seed, or approximately to 2 inches. Place the seed in the hole and cover it completely. 9.

Short Horse Chestnut tree facts. Name Aesculus hippocastanum Family Spindaceae Type hoq. Height 50 to feet 15 to 45 meters Exposure full sun Soil rich and cool. The planting usually is in October when the first horse chestnuts naturally start germinating. You can also set horse chestnuts up to germinate in a pot over the winter and transplant them to the ground in spring. It is known to all since children often play with the fruits come fall.

In Britain how long is the flight from glasgow to egypt call them conkers. Great activity for your children: germinate a horse chestnut in a glass filled with soil mix. Water it a ti and just let it grow! Your email address will not be published.

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Facebook Pinterest Twitter Email. Home Gardening Trees and shrubs Horse chestnut tree. Log in or Join. Meet the community. Need advice? On the same topic Horse chestnut tree health benefits, properties Also called conker tree, the horse chestnut tree is native to the Middle East and to the Balkan area.

The Chestnut, fruit that symbolizes fall The chestnut is definitely a fruit that symbolizes fall. Chestnut health benefits and therapeutic value The chestnut Castanea sativa is the fruit of the chestnut tree which is native to Southern Europe and Asia Minor. Plabt have a question Ask my question. I'd like to comment Post a comment. Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published.

Planting a horse chestnut tree

Unlike regular chestnuts, the fruit of the horse chestnut tree is inedible to humans. The pollen from this tree may cause allergic reactions. Aesculus hippocastanum Growing Guide. Like most trees, Aesculus hippocastanum needs plenty of room to grow. Choose an empty area in your garden so the tree has plenty of space to spread out its roots. Jan 17, Remove the horse chestnuts from the cold treatment, and plant them indoors in deep containers with excellent drainage, as horse chestnuts are prone to rot when conditions are too wet. Plant the conkers at least two times as deep as their height. Place the newly potted seeds in a warm and sunny window. Growing New Horse Chestnuts with Cuttings. Planting a horse chestnut tree The planting usually is in October when the first horse chestnuts naturally start germinating. They grow very fast and their root development will have had a running start before winter. You can also set horse chestnuts up to germinate in a pot over the winter and transplant them to the ground in spring.

With its spreading canopy and fragrant flower clusters, California horse chestnut Aesculus californica , also called California buckeye, adds summertime shade and ornamental appeal to low-water landscaping. It grows best within U. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 7 and 8, where it reaches a mature height of 10 to 20 feet with a to foot spread.

California horse chestnut seeds germinate reliably if kept under moist conditions, providing a reliable means of at-home propagation.

However, they must first be hulled and treated with bleach to prevent rot and eliminate parasites. Put on rubber gloves before working with horse chestnuts since they contain toxic saponins and will irritate the skin of sensitive individuals. Wear long sleeves, as well, to further limit your contact with the seeds.

Remove the spiny husks from the horse chestnuts. Carefully press the blade of a paring knife onto the husk until it penetrates. Score around the husk until it is cut in half. Peel off the two halves and discard them. Place the hulled horse chestnuts in a bucket of water. Soak them for 24 hours to soften the inner hull. Drain off the water the next day and lay the seeds on a flat surface to drain.

Place the horse chestnuts in the bucket. Pour 5-percent bleach into the bucket until the seeds are barely covered. Soak them for one minute. Remove the seeds and rinse them thoroughly. Discard the bleach. Fill the bottom one-third of a sealable plastic bag with moistened perlite. Place the horse chestnuts in the bag.

Add more moistened perlite until the horse chestnuts are completely covered. Seal the bag. Store the horse chestnuts inside the refrigerator for six to eight weeks. Remoisten the perlite with a spray bottle whenever necessary to maintain a constant level of light moisture. Do not let the perlite dry out completely. Prepare planting containers just before removing the horse chestnuts from the refrigerator. Fill 6-inch nursery containers with a moistened mixture of equal parts milled peat moss, shredded pine bark, perlite and coarse sand.

Sow one horse chestnut in each container. Dig a planting hole with a depth equal to the diameter of the seed, or approximately 1.

Place the seed in the hole and cover it completely. Place the planting containers outdoors under partial shade. Maintain a moderate level of moisture in the top 2 inches of soil. Allow the surface to dry between waterings.

Watch for germination three weeks after planting. Avoid overwatering at this point since the seedlings will develop poorly. Transplant the young horse chestnut seedlings into a permanent bed with acidic soil once they grow to 4 inches in height and have several sets of leaves.

Samantha McMullen began writing professionally in Her nearly 20 years of experience in horticulture informs her work, which has appeared in publications such as Mother Earth News. By Sasha Degnan. Related Articles. Wash your hands and clothing thoroughly after working with horse chestnuts to avoid accidentally ingesting the toxic compounds present in their flesh and sap.

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