How to find out the history of my house

how to find out the history of my house

How To Find Out The History Of Your House

Nov 29,  · Simply input your county name, state and the word “assessor” for an online peek and better idea about the history of your house. • Consult census records Estimated Reading Time: 3 mins. Oct 05,  · Determine The Time Period First, you need to accurately pinpoint the era in which your house was built. If that information was not made available when Estimated Reading Time: 3 mins.

Property records are available to the public, and anyone who wants to find out the history of how to drill a water well by hand house can do so. The availability of property records without charge will vary from state to state and even from county to county. However, many counties offer free searches to the public, either online or in person, and may only charge fees for copies of documents.

Interested parties can search through the property tax records, mortgage records and deed records to put together a home's history. Property records are public records available at county offices. Many counties have records available online. Some counties allow free searches and only charge for copies of documents, while other counties may charge for access to records.

Property history searches can include searches for deed and mortgage records as well as property tax records. All real estate is subject to property taxes, assessed by the county, the city or both.

Most of the time, property taxes are based upon the assessed value of the real estate and charged accordingly, usually quarterly but sometimes annually or bi-annually. The government agency that assesses property taxes typically also keeps property tax records, although that's not always the case.

Exactly what agency that is depends on the county. Property tax records can show the history of tax assessments and assessed values for a parcel of real estate, and they might show the ownership history if the records allow you to view the tax assessment postcards from years past.

They also show how much the taxes are and whether they're paid or past due. Most large counties and some rural counties have how much is a ton of recycled paper worth records online; otherwise, searches and inquiries can be made at the county office during office hours.

Real estate ownership is evidenced by deed. The property owner will have a deed showing that the prior owner transferred the property to her, and the deed should be recorded with the county where the property is located.

Deeds are recorded with the county so that everyone is on notice as to who owns the property. The county recorder of deeds or register of deeds is typically the agency that keeps land records, and deed searches may be performed either on the county website or at the county office.

New York City's land records are available online, for instance, by searching the owner's name or the property's block, lot and borough. Searches are free, and document images are also free. Mortgage records are also kept by the county register of deeds or recorder of deeds, as are other types of recorded encumbrances such as easements and assignments.

Like deeds, they can be searched either online or in person, often for free but sometimes with a fee. Mortgages and similar instruments show who owns the property in addition to showing that a bank or other entity has an interest in the property due to a loan or other money owed.

While free searches are available, the most thorough way to get the history of a home is to pay for a title search. A title search will show the deed history as well as all mortgages, easements, assignments and judgment liens.

If someone is searching the history of a home for financial purposes, such as an intent to purchase the property, a title search will give the biggest picture, and the title company will insure the title. Rebecca K. McDowell is a creditors' rights attorney with a special focus on bankruptcy and insolvency.

She has a B. She has written legal articles for Nolo and the Bankruptcy Site. Reviewed by: Michelle Seidel, B. Florida Tax Laws on Mobile Homes.

Property Listings

Mar 27,  · First, click on the state where you’re searching on the interactive map display. Then, select which county the house is in. This will then show you a list of the different online public records that are maintained by the county. For example, many counties now offer a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) on their local government ctcwd.comted Reading Time: 8 mins. Jul 20,  · Get to Know Your Home Begin your search by looking closely at the building for clues about its age. Look at the type of construction, the materials used in construction, the shape of the roofline, the placement of the windows, ctcwd.comted Reading Time: 7 mins. Nov 30,  · Title Searches for a Fee While free searches are available, the most thorough way to get the history of a home is to pay for a title search. A title search will show the deed history as well as all mortgages, easements, assignments and judgment liens.

If you live in an older home, you may have wondered about its past. First, you need to accurately pinpoint the era in which your house was built. If that information was not made available when you purchased the home, you can probably figure it out by checking out some architecture books that show styles that were predominant in different time periods. Sometimes, revealing the true original style of your home requires some digging, as renovation can hide elements that time forgot.

If you have the desire to really dig in, official records can help confirm your guesses and findings. Getty Images Justin Sullivan. Once you have some names and dates, you can use genealogical sites to dig a little deeper. Another surprising source of clues about former residents of your home may lie in the attic, basement, shed or yard.

If you poke around in these areas, you may turn up artifacts that can help you learn more about the demographics of the people who lived there, such as toys indicating children or tools indicating craftsmen. According to Architectural Digest , while there are instances in which real estate agents are required to disclose information about a death in a home, many states do not require it.

Flickr Ruth and Dave. If all else fails, the DC Historic Preservation Office, HumanitiesDC and the Library of Congress hold an annual House History Day , a workshop that provides participants with information on property research tools and strategies, including maps, city directories and online databases.

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